Unplug, Unwind, and Discern

Olivia Hastie ’22

 

One of the many life-giving experiences at Holy Cross is the Spiritual Exercises Retreat. Students from all faith backgrounds and communities sign up to partake in this experience because it offers a peaceful environment to rest and reflect.   A brief description of the Exercises as written on the Holy Cross Retreats webpage

What do you desire? What is God inviting you to? How do you integrate your faith with decisions you make in your life? What are the movements of your heart? Do you desire freedom and inner peace? An adapted version of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, this five-day silent retreat is an opportunity for reflection and prayer. In silence, you will be given the opportunity to reflect more deeply about your faith, the power of God’s love for you and your relationship to others. In addition, time for personal prayer and reflection and liturgies, thematic talks are given by the Chaplain retreat directors to help assist in your faith journey.”

This five day silent retreat offers students an opportunity to unplug, unwind, and discern where their Holy Cross education is taking them. As a sophomore making lots of decisions like where to study abroad, what to major in, and where my Holy Cross education is taking me, I thought fall break would be the perfect time to attend. I had also never been to the Thomas P. Joyce ‘59 Contemplative Center  and was feeling a little bit left out of that part of my Holy Cross experience. I’m so glad I ended up deciding to participate. 

I knew a little bit about the Exercises from classes I had taken and my general knowledge of the Jesuits. Though challenging, the silence was a beautiful way to experience discernment and contemplation. I’ll also add that throughout the five days, each day contains four sessions where you hear and learn about the actual exercises of Ignatius. Each day participants also have the chance to meet with a Spiritual Director to talk about where he or she is in her faith journey and what he or she is looking to accomplish on the retreat. Realistically it’s not complete silence. There’s also lots of individual activities, like painting, hiking, and playing instruments.

The retreat also takes you through the Jesuit concept of finding and knowing God. Over the course of the five days, I experienced several moments where my vision of God changed. Instead of seeing God as a higher power, I started to see God as a friend walking with me through life. This is one of the many revelations I experienced on retreat. Other people go on the retreat to begin their relationship with God, and others go to be still. It was particularly moving to watch the sunrise each morning and remind myself that there is something greater than I out there. The experience was overwhelming life giving, reminding me to take time to be still and be reflective.

Overall, it was an exceptionally moving experience. Students from any faith background can have a moving experience of the exercises. Spending five days unplugged and silent helped me not only grow in faith but grow in my own self-knowledge. I took time to think about what the future may hold and how I want to spend my next two years at Holy Cross. I’m looking forward to hopefully going again senior year and using the time to pray and think about my own life in a different way.

The Allegory of Committee

 

Much like the people depicted in Plato’s Republic, my colleagues and I have recently spent a great deal of time in a dark space looking straight ahead. However, while the protagonist in the “Allegory of the Cave” is forced to grapple with the meaning of shadows, statues, fire, and sunlight, the Holy Cross admission staff has pondered over academic rigor, personal statements, interview notes, and letters of recommendation. Having just completed our admission committee process for the Class of 2023, it feels like the right time to reflect on our work and the work of our applicants…through a liberal arts lens, of course.

While Plato’s cavemen and cavewomen view the shadows on the wall as their one true reality, Holy Cross’ admission counselors never lose sight of the fact that our applicants are more than what can be seen on our projector screens. Through interviews, essays, recommendations, and conversations, we strive to know each applicant on a personal level so that we can fully understand and evaluate the essence of every individual.

I can’t tell you how happy we are to walk out of our cave committee room and interact with the Holy Cross Class of 2023 during Admitted Student Day in April. We are thrilled to watch new students join us for summer orientations and to see the impact that each new Crusader will have on our campus over the next four years. Like Plato’s philosopher who is initially blinded by the sun, first days on the Hill will be marked by adjustment and awakening. Fortunately, the education that you will receive and the experiences that you will have atop Mount Saint James will ultimately transform you and point you towards the Form of the Good in life.

 

-Tom McHugh

ED Admitted: Next Steps

     There is nothing better than knowing where you are going to college early-on in your senior year of high school. I applied ED to Holy Cross because I knew there was no other place for me. I loved everything about this school from the people to the buildings and even the hills. ED was a big commitment and I remember hitting send on the application was daunting. I wouldn’t have done it any other way. I’m incredibly happy that I applied ED, because I truly had time to anticipate the next part of my life and the changes ahead. The transition to Holy Cross is challenging and takes much preparation. Here are some of my personal tips and tricks to maximize college readiness before you begin your time on the Hill.

  1. Don’t slack off with your school work now that you’ve gotten into and committed to a college. The Holy Cross Admission team asserts that your acceptance is secured by maintaining good grades. For many of my ED friends, the transition to Holy Cross was much harder because of the fact that they really hadn’t studied for anything since the fall of senior year. Classes here hit the ground running as soon as you arrive so be sure to continue to practice good study habits so they are fresh when you get here. Also, finish strong! If you were accepted to Holy Cross, you are a phenomenal student. Don’t stop now. Classes are challenging but manageable and professors are incredibly supportive and helpful.
  2. Connect with your classmates via the Facebook group and Instagram. I met my best friend here through Instagram and I’m so happy I did. Don’t be afraid to DM each other, and if you live in the same area grab coffee and get to know each other. The transition into college is much easier when you already have a community of people you know. It also makes events like Summer Gateways Orientation extremely fun because you get to experience everything with a group.
  3. College is not at all like  high school. The biggest lesson I’ve learned since arriving at Holy Cross is the fact that college is very different from high school. You no longer have parents telling you to wake up and get ready, meal times are when you want them, and you have more freedom and autonomy over your schedule. These differences become apparent as soon as your parents leave you on move-in day. Over time, I’ve discovered other differences that helped me grow more comfortable. College students are generally more mature. You never have to feel nervous about asking a stranger if you can sit with them in Kimball Dining Hall.
  4. Everybody is in the same boat. Walking in as a first-year student is really hard especially during orientation. My orientation group was awesome and I still talk to all the students, but we also ended up forming friendships outside of the group. I wish I had known early on that so many people feel that way going through the orientation process. It’s important to know finding your best friends doesn’t happen overnight. It took me a really long time to solidify my friendships here and even part of the way into the second semester I feel like I’m still making friends. It takes time so don’t sweat it, because you are not alone. Just get involved on campus and you’ll find your community, that’s how I did it.
  5. Branch out. That said, don’t confine yourself to one group of people. Eat meals with people in your classes, in your clubs, or on your floor. Be sure to introduce yourself to people. Holy Cross is a small campus full of friendly people who are here to make friends and get to know you.. There is nothing better than sitting in the Hogan Campus Center and having many different people say hello to you. Sometimes it can be distracting but it’s really telling of the community built here.
  6. Try and visit (again). If you know anyone currently studying at Holy Cross, contact them and try to come and visit. Get to know the campus more. I’ve been visiting Holy Cross since I was little, but for the people who don’t know the campus as well, visit a bunch of times. It’s extremely helpful to get an understanding of campus before you arrive.

We are so excited for the Class of 2023 to join us here on the Hill. Spring semester is here in full swing and there are so many wonderful adventures to embark on here at Holy Cross. Stay focused on the rest of senior year and look forward to the next four years at Holy Cross.

 

-Olivia H. ’22

Dining at HC

I remember looking at colleges and constantly asking what the food was like on each campus. I imagine that many prospective students share that curiosity. Holy Cross has many on-campus dining options for students to enjoy while they hang out with friends, study, or meet with professors. There’s coffee, burgers, home-style cooking and more. The meal plan per semester for most students is as follows: students receive an unlimited amount of meal swipes per semester to the Kimball Main Dining Room, eight meal swipes per week in Lower Kimball , and $425 dining dollars that can be used at Cool Beans, Cafe Babel, D’Agostino Cafe, Crossroads, The Pub, and the Lobby Shop.

 

The main dining room is located at the bottom of campus in Kimball Hall. The Kimball main dining room has a plethora of options. At breakfast, there is an omelette station where students can create their own omelette, fried eggs, scrambled eggs, or egg sandwiches, with various breakfast sides. At lunch the omelette bar turns over to a stir fry station where students can create a stir fry bowl, the sandwich bar opens up (that’s my favorite, try a spinach wrap with chicken salad, lettuce, tomato, and chipotle mayo), the burger bar is stocked with plenty of toppings, and the classics station offers a hot meal prepared by the dining staff. Lunch and dinner stations are basically the same, however, the classics station changes.

 

A hot meal at the classics station in Kimball could be anything like roasted chicken, short ribs, or Mexican pulled pork for tacos. Students would all agree that the best meal in Kimball is chicken parmesan. Chicken parm night happens roughly once a month and almost the entire student body waits in line for this highly anticipated meal. Other events that students attend consistently are holiday themed meals. Most recently, we celebrated Thanksgiving in the main dining room with a full turkey dinner- stuffing, mashed potatoes, and pie. Kimball is an all-you-can- eat dining experience that only cost students one meal swipe. Another favored option in Kimball is the mac and cheese. It is out of this world and everyone finds time to get there when they see it on the menu. You can check the dining menus for every location online to decide where you want to go for each meal.

 

Another dining option on campus is the Lower Kimball Food Court which is considered  more of a lunch spot. Students can choose from Habaneros- a Mexican food place (the Chalupa bowls are amazing), Villa Prima- the pizza place, The Grill for hamburgers and hot dogs, or the Deli for delicious sandwiches. Check lower Kimball out on Wednesdays because they have grilled cheese sandwiches made with garlic bread and creamy tomato soup. I go to Lower Kimball for grilled cheese every week because it’s my absolute favorite lunch of all time.

 

We also have places like Crossroads and the Pub which are both located in the Hogan Campus Center on the bottom floor. The Pub makes delightful salads, sandwiches, and wraps. Additionally, Holy Cross is not a dry campus so the pub turns into a bar on Tuesday nights for those students who are 21 and older. I recommend the chicken caesar salad from the Pub, but you can also build your own salad as well with anything you want in it. Crossroads feeds everybody’s late night cravings. They have chicken fingers, fries, mozzarella sticks, and mac and cheese bites. The mac and cheese bites are so good, especially after a long night of studying.

 

Campus also has two coffee shops: Cool Beans on the first floor of Hogan and Cafe Babel located in the Stein academic building. I order a coffee from Cool Beans every morning, but I also love to get their breakfast sandwiches. You can order any breakfast sandwich on any type of bagel. In addition to coffee and breakfast sandwiches, you can get smoothies at both locations. During the holiday seasons they have specialty drinks including pumpkin spiced lattes in the fall and peppermint hot chocolate before Christmas. At night, Cool Beans also becomes an ice cream bar where you can order milkshakes.

 

The last place for dining is the newest: the D’Agostino Cafe located in our Integrated Science Complex. This is a student favorite for lunch. They have soups, sandwiches, and salads all of which have received positive reviews from students. It’s expensive so save your dining dollars. Try to go even if you don’t have any classes in the science building, it’s totally worth it. I’m a theatre major who will probably never have a class in the Science Complex and I try to go there as often as possible because it’s that good. No matter where you eat on campus the food is delightful.

 

-Olivia Hastie ’22

Music at Holy Cross

 

Are you interest in music at Holy Cross? Then look no further, this blog is for you!

 

My name is Kyle Irvine, and I’m writing alongside another student at the college, Joanna Aramini. I am a sophomore Economics and Music double major with a minor in Italian, and I am involved in the College Choir and Chamber Singers through the Department of Music and music ministry through the Office of the College Chaplains. Joanna is a senior Art History and Sociology double major who has been involved with music all of her time at Holy Cross. She first joined the College Choir, and has since taken many music courses simply out of interest!  Our blog is intended to make prospective students more aware of all the amazing music opportunities offered at Holy Cross, and to give some current student perspective. Happy reading! 🙂

Rooted in the liberal arts tradition, music is an integral part of life at Holy Cross for many students, regardless of course of study or musical experience. As a universal form of expression, music transcends the boundaries of culture and time, and Holy Cross provides an opportunity for students to engage with music and the arts, offering a wide array of courses rooted in the Western, jazz, world, and popular traditions. As a department that offers a rigorous academic program to majors, courses that span thousands of years of music history and social issues to non-majors, and a diverse array of ensembles open to all, several hundred students are attracted to the Department of Music each semester!

Music courses explore history, theory, technology, and performance and all foster an interconnected environment of teacher-student interaction and collaboration both inside and outside of the classroom. The music department has 12 faculty members in musicology, composition, and performance, two artists-in-residence, and many private instrumental instructs, all who offer performance and research opportunities to students as well!

Department sponsored ensembles range from the Chamber Orchestra and College Choir to the Balinese Gamelan ensemble and the Holy Cross Laptop Ensemble Federation (H-CLEF). Outside of the department, there are four a cappella groups, a songwriting club, the Chapel Choir through the Office of the College Chaplains, and more! And what’s better than all of these opportunities? The fact that you don’t have to be a music major to participate in them. In fact, the majority of students involved in these ensembles are not music majors and do not have to audition!

Now that you’re aware of the greatness of the Holy Cross Music Department, don’t take our word for it! Check out what other students involved with music have to say about our programs:

 

“Holy Cross is unique among most Catholic colleges and most small liberal arts colleges of its kind in the fact that is offers a Music Major.  I wanted to attend a school with a strong Catholic identity and reputation for academic excellence, but I didn’t want to sacrifice my interest in music.  At Holy Cross I haven’t needed to compromise any of my interests.” -Rose Grosskopf ‘20, Music and English double major

 

“As a music major, Holy Cross has become my home mostly due to the Music Department.  While meeting new people in your first year of college is hard, I made friends with my fellow ensemble members right away, and they have remained some of my closest friends to this day.  Since the community at Holy Cross is so tight-knit, I am able to interact with members of the choir throughout my day in classes, the dining hall, and even just walking around campus, and always being able to say hi to friends as I walk from class to class is one of my favorite parts about this school.  I also have grown musically through my time in musical ensembles at this school, and I have more confidence in my musical abilities after even just a year at this school.” -Meghan O’Keefe ‘21, Music and Psychology double major

 

“The community of performers that I’ve had the privilege of getting to know are some of the kindest and most dedicated individuals that I have ever met.  Not only are they focused, driven to excellence, and extremely talented, everywhere you go there is a spirit of generosity and gratitude.  This kind of commitment to the music and to one another helps every musician, actor, and scholar here to excel.  Our community and our art draws us together, and it helps us all strive to be the best we can be. I think that’s why we succeed, and create the art that we do: we shine for the sake of our own musical growth, and just as much to lift up the entire ensemble.” -Sadie O’Conor ‘22, undeclared

 

“The wide variety, whether you are an instrumentalist, vocalist, or just interested in the theory behind it.  You can explore so many different styles and mediums.” -Christina Dressel ‘20, Biology and Spanish double major

 

“Music programs at Holy Cross provide freshmen with an easy way to get involved on campus and in the greater community of Worcester.  Each semester brings with it new repertoire and a series of performances for new audiences.  Often times, we have the opportunity to collaborate with other groups on campus.  For instance, the College Choir performed a beautiful piece with Concert Band last semester, which was a new experience for many of the younger students, especially.” -Theresa Gervais ‘20, Spanish major

 

“I think the best thing about the music programs offered at Holy Cross is that they are filled with students from so many different backgrounds and academic disciplines.  Music students do not just stick to music students here.  The diversity among the students in music programs is really wonderful because it allows for so many different opinions and views to be represented in music and throughout campus.  Students who participate in music programs are extremely well rounded and absolutely love what they do!  I also really love how supportive everyone is of the students in music programs; there are always other students, professors, and faculty who support these students by coming to concerts and other performances.  Whether you are involved in music or not on campus, it is something that brings many people together in ways that other disciplines cannot.” -Joanna Aramini ‘19, Art History and Sociology double major

 

“I think the best thing offered about music programs at Holy Cross is the sheer amount of talent that is present in our school.  With programs such as the Brooks Scholarship and Organ Scholarship, incredibly gifted people populate the groups.” -Jacob Fisher ‘21, International Studies and German double major

 

Music at Holy Cross does not just lie in performance opportunities, but reaches out into the entire student body and further out into our community.  Under the direction of Prof. Allegra Martin over the last year and a half, the College Choir and Chamber Singers have had ample opportunity for collaboration with our wider campus community.  Recently, the Holy Cross College Choir provided the music for the liturgy of the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, celebrating the 175th anniversary of the College, in addition to providing music for the Mass of the Holy Spirit each year, welcoming first-year students to the Hill.  Last year with the Office of Arts Transcending Borders, the Chamber Singers had the opportunity to work with Theatre of War Productions and the Phil Woodmore Singers to perform a piece called Antigone in Ferguson, which draws parallels between the Sophocles tragedy and the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri.  This fall, the Chamber Singers performed David Lang’s Pulitzer Prize-winning composition the little match girl passion alongside Maine-based Figures of Speech Theatre with Arts Transcending Borders.

This collaboration does not stop on the Hill. The College Choir combined forces with the Worcester Polytechnic Institute’s Women’s Alden Voices and Men’s Glee Club for a choral collaboration concert, showcasing both ensembles before combining to close the performance.  Students were able to meet and work with talented singers from WPI, an invaluable experience. Check out what some of our students had to say about our recent collaboration! (and check out the picture below of the two joint choirs!)

 

 

“As college students in Worcester, we are in a unique position in that there are so many other college students in the city that we can interact with at local events. This concert was a great way to bring students from two schools that share a love of music together, and I was excited to meet other Worcester students who have the same passion as I do.” -Meghan O’Keefe ‘21, Music and Psychology double major

 

“I am most excited to get out and perform in Worcester. I have many great opportunities to perform on campus, so I am excited to share what the College Choir has to offer with a different audience in the Worcester community.” Lauren Carey ‘19, Music major, Education minor

 

“This experience gave me a chance to get to know other students involved in music in Worcester.  Being able to collaborate with WPI was a great opportunity to make connections across schools and learn about what other students enjoy doing here in the city.” -Hannah Baker ‘21, Music and Sociology double major


No matter what students study at Holy Cross, they are able to find comfort in music if they so desire. Distinctive among nationally ranked liberal arts colleges, the Department of Music here at Holy Cross offers ample opportunity for all students to explore their love of music, whether it be inside or outside the classroom. In fact, Holy Cross plans to expand their music programs, with the creation of the new Center for the Arts and Creativity. This facility, to be built in upcoming years, will incorporate brand new concert halls, performances spaces, technology, and collaboration spaces for Holy Cross’s current and future art students– we are very excited for it!

We hope reading this blog provided some insight into the Department of Music and all of its greatness! Thanks for reading and happy music making!

 

 

 

Fall Traditions at Holy Cross

 

New England is known for its amazing fall foliage and crisp autumn weather…and Holy Cross certainly enjoys its fair share of autumn color. HC is beautiful all year round, but campus is particularly stunning in October and November. Travel + Leisure named us the most beautiful college in MA for a reason! Fall is personally my favorite season at Holy Cross, not just for the beautiful scenery, but also for the many events that happen on Mount Saint James during the semester. While the ivy on the side of Holy Cross’ brick buildings turns orange, red, and yellow as the seasons change, our campus is set ablaze as well. Among the festivities are tailgates and football games, Family Weekend, Halloween, Thanksgiving, and of course all of the fall-themed activities that you can do off-campus such as apple picking.

 

Tailgate and football season is one of the fall activities that Holy Cross students and alumni look forward to most. It’s a blast to spend time with friends and family over food and drinks and then go and cheer on the HC Football team at Fitton Field. Many parents and alumni show their Crusader pride at every single game, bleeding purple and showing their love and support for Holy Cross. With football season also comes fall homecoming weekend, when even more alumni return to campus to show their enthusiasm and support for alma mater. They come to spend time with their fellow alumni as well as with their children who go to Holy Cross now! Family weekend is also a great opportunity for families to spend time with their their HC student’s friends and vice versa! I love getting to know my friends’ families better and I look forward to having them on campus. It doesn’t hurt that they usually take us out to dinner on Shrewsbury Street too!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Halloween is of course another well-known fall event that people get excited about around campus. Just because we are too old to trick-or-treat, doesn’t mean that dressing up with your friends isn’t still a lot of fun! Creating and putting together fun group costumes is exciting and something that I definitely look forward to as the end of October nears!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As soon as Halloween is behind us, we quickly turn our sights to Thanksgiving. Kimball, our dining hall, annually serves a Thanksgiving dinner before break begins, so if you love Thanksgiving food, you’re in luck! Not only will you get to eat a delicious food at home over the holiday, you’ll also get to have turkey and sides at Kimball as well. The menu includes turkey, stuffing, cranberry sauce, squash, pies, apple cider, and pretty much every traditional Thanksgiving food that you can imagine! Cool Beans and the D’Agostino Cafe also embrace the fall spirit by adding pumpkin flavored coffee drinks to the menu and offering options like hot apple cider!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Apple picking and pumpkin picking are fun activities to do with your friends on a fall day if you’re looking to go off campus. My friends and I went apple picking at Tougas Family Farm earlier this month and it was so much fun…they even had scrumptious apple cider donuts, warm cider, caramel apples, and plenty of other fall treats at the farm stand. No matter what part of fall you love most, there is definitely something for you to enjoy at Holy Cross!

 

Sader Summer Scoop: Kerrin Mannion ’19

 

 

Name: Kerrin Mannion

Major/Minor/Concentration: English

Graduation Year: 2019

What are you doing this summer?: Internship

 

 

 

 

 

What exactly are you doing?: Boston Ballet School Marketing/Communications Intern

How did you hear about this opportunity?: Crusader Connections

What are you most excited about doing within this program?: I am excited to help with the school’s social media. I was an intern for Holy Cross Marketing’s social media so I’m looking forward to expanding the skills I learned there.

What are you hoping to gain from your experience?: I hope to enhance my writing skills and learn how to transfer them to a business setting. I also hope to learn about the brand and how it maintains its integrity through all of its communications.

Do you have any advice for prospective students thinking about doing an internship?: I think it’s best to keep an open mind when doing an internship. Sometimes there are aspects of the job that might not be exactly what you expected but it’s best to look at every moment as a learning opportunity. Even if there is a task you don’t like as much, it will help you weigh the pros and cons and determine whether you really want to pursue that field in the future.

When you were in high school, did you expect to have this opportunity in college?: I definitely did not expect to have this opportunity. I had always danced as a child throughout high school, so it is amazing to be able to help with the marketing initiatives for such a world renowned dance program.

Sader Summer Scoop: Milagros Montenegro ’18

 

 

 

Name: Milagros Montenegro

Major/Minor/Concentration: Sociology

Graduation Year: 2018

What are you doing this summer?: Internship

 

 

 

 

What exactly are you doing?: Research Assistant for Field Research Gallo-Cruz Worcester Women’s Activist

How did you hear about this opportunity?: Professor Gallo-Cruz

What are you most excited about doing within this program?: Placing my understanding of sociology into application.

What are you hoping to gain from your experience?: Learning more about the Worcester community through the stories of its women.

Do you have any advice for prospective students thinking about doing an internship?: Do what sounds exciting and challenging both academically and personally, that’s the only way you will grow as a student/person in the next four years.

When you were in high school, did you expect to have this opportunity in college?:No, but I am extremely fortunate and excited for it.

 


Interviewee Pastor Judy and she runs the LGBT Asylum Seekers Task Force here in Worcester.

Sader Summer Scoop: Emily Sullivan ’19

 

 

 

Name: Emily Sullivan

Major/Minor/Concentration: Psychology/Sociology

Graduation Year: 2019

What are you doing this summer?: Research

 

 

 

 

What exactly are you doing?: This summer, as a recipient of the Greisch Scholarship, Dr. Gallo-Cruz and I are analyzing both self-help books as well as memoirs which focus on the topic of dysfunctional families. We are coding these books for the types of dysfunction and the circumstances surrounding the situational or personal challenges they faced. Stemming from this, and most importantly, we are looking at how these people have overcome and moved past their difficult histories. Additionally, we are putting these codes into a coding software that allows us to compare across the different books.

How did you hear about this opportunity?: My sociology advisor, Dr. Gallo-Cruz, had previously created this project with a Holy Cross alumnus. She asked me to help her this summer in the next stage of the project, which I accepted.

What are you most excited about doing within this program?: This research allows me to put what I learn in the classroom into practice. Seeing the theories and concepts which I have learned map directly onto the cases that I am studying displays the direct correlation between theory, practice, and real world application.

What are you hoping to gain from your experience?: This experience gives me the opportunity to see what it is like to be a social scientist. Additionally, I will be participating in the Sociology Honors Program my senior year and this work will be helpful practice for me in creating my thesis.

Do you have any advice for prospective students thinking about doing research?: I would highly recommend doing summer research. It gives you a different perspective on the work that you do as a student as well as that of your professors. If you want to do summer research, talk to your advisors. They can directly assist you or help you find someone who can. Your advisors also know your strengths and weaknesses as well as the classes you have taken which also can help them send you in the right direction.

When you were in high school, did you expect to have this opportunity in college?: I did not expect to have this opportunity in college. Most people just think about the opportunities that you have during the academic year, but Holy Cross offers many different options for the summer as well that I didn’t even know about until I got here.

Tips for Your Next Campus Visit

 

 

The summer is a great time to visit college campuses and get an idea of what the school is like. Below are some tips to help make your visit a successful one.

 

What to do:

– Ask questions about what interests you! Your tour guide would love to share their student perspective.

– Answer questions if the tour guide asks. Be interactive!

– Be prepared. Wear appropriate footwear for a tour because you will be walking around a lot. HC is very hill-y and has a lot of stairs. Don’t forget to bring water on those hot summer days.

– Arrive early to have enough time to check-in or use the restroom. Tours leave promptly at the time stated.

– Arrange accommodations. If you need special accommodations such as a wheelchair, arrange it with the office before arriving to campus.

– Don’t be shy. Ask to be directed to other sources for more information. Or ask your tour guide for their email if you have follow up questions.

 

What not to do:

– Use your phone or answer a phone call. It can be distracting for others who are trying to enjoy the tour and even your tour guide.

– Walk away from the group. It is difficult for a guide to keep track of everyone or hold up the group by waiting for someone who wandered off. Allow extra time after your tour to explore the campus.

– Interrupt your guide while they are speaking. Once they are finished, they will be available for questions.

– Fall behind. It is difficult for tour guides to speak loudly enough for everyone to hear, especially if people are falling behind.

– Get frustrated. Try to keep calm and not get annoyed with the tour guide. They do their best to answer all of your questions honestly and to the best of their knowledge.

– Ask personal questions. They are willing to answer questions related to the College, but please respect their privacy.

 

Good questions to ask your tour guide:

  1. What made you choose your major/minor/concentration?
  2. What is your favorite thing about Holy Cross or Worcester?
  3. What are you involved in on campus?
  4. What have you learned at HC that you will take with you beyond your college years?
  5. What is the benefit of a liberal arts education?
  6. In what aspects of campus life are Jesuit values most evident? What about social life, academics or religion?

 

Want more out of your tour? Check out our Summer Tour Guide’s HC Visit Bucket List!

  1. Visit the bookstore.
  2. Walk around and watch students interact with one another. (Get an authentic feel of the student body.)
  3. Visit the dining hall.
  4. Visit the athletic center.
  5. If you see a professor or student walking by, stop them and ask them some questions.